Egypt: Underground Revolution

Egypt: Underground Revolution

The hip-hop and underground Egyptian movement began well before the revolution of 2011 to denounce the injustice of the Mubarak regime. Tahrir Square was the conclusion of a long social journey in which even the band of local rappers have reaped the rewards of their protests and their songs have become anthems of the revolution. The ‘underground’ Arab hip-hop seems to have found the initial message of protest without imitating the American movement, keeping proud roots in the Egyptian culture, mixing sounds and traditions. The fame achieved by some of these bands have also allowed others to come out and many disciplines to finally have a recognition , from street art to skate-boarding , from parkour to freestyle football. Read more…

Top 5: Summer of Raptivism

We at RAPOLITICS had a very busy summer. So here you have five examples of pure raptivism – check them out! Read more…

Palestinian Artivism in the Streets of Copenhagen

Seven young Palestinian street artists visited Denmark in July 2014 in order to bring some artivism and decorate a series of murals and tunnels with Danish graffiti artists. They were invited by the Danish organization StreetStudies to participate in a project funded by the Danish Center for Culture and Development. The purpose of the project was to provide the young artists from Nablus, Ramallah and Jerusalem with a creative platform where they could learn more about graffiti and street art, express their views in murals and engage in a dialogue with Danish artists and the public in general. Read more…

Hip-Hop Generates Hope in the Ghetto of Dakar

The poverty, unemployment and crime rate is huge in the ghetto area Pikine outside the Senegalese capital Dakar. Once, hanging in the street corner, was the only thing to do. But since 2006 street-art schools have allotted alternatives which have produced dreams about a better life as a hip-hop artist. And dreams generates hope. Read more…

Transforming Egypt through Hip-Hop

Something changed in the hip-hop scene in Egypt the last couple of years. And something changed in the hip-hoppers as well. Egypt has been in a chaotic state since the so-called Arab Spring, and the youth of Egypt have in general had to face a lot of new things and change their way of thinking. In Alexandria the hip-hop scene were also active in this transformation of Egypt, but it also transformed itself. RAPOLITICS wanted together with Revolution Records, the first Egyptian underground hip-hop label, to help boost this transformation. Therefore, we established a recording studio with the purpose of uniting the Alexandrian hip-hop community and put spotlight on Arabic hip-hop.

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In a South Sudan State of Mind

This is the first blog post in a series related to the upcoming project ‘Oyee! Give Peace a Chance’ – a project that focuses on the world’s youngest nation and how raptivists there use rap as a way to promote peace and reconciliation.

An optimistic tone was never harder to strike. Having known such adventures and challenges, having experienced the multitudes and beauties of the people and the land, and having cried, laughed and sworn my head off – for two amazing years in South Sudan – my heart is breaking. As I write this, the United Nations has confirmed the newest rounds of massacres of civilians, and South Sudan seems to have surely descended into what seems like the deepest abyss. Read more…

Rap in the Veins

The 14th of January 2009 four Israeli missiles stroke the place where Ayman lived with his family in Gaza. Ayman was in his room and did not get injured, but the attack killed his father and left his brother seriously wounded. Two days after the attack, on Ayman’s birthday, his father was buried. Read more…

Palestinian Female Rapper back in Denmark

Safeya Hathot aka Safaa 3arapeye was born and raised in Palestine. Safaa began to rap as a 15-year-old. She couldn’t get her parents’ permission to hang out with the other rappers because they all were boys, but luckily she found another girl to rap with. Since then, she has enjoyed the full support of her parents, who like many in Palestine have discovered Safaa’s talent for rhythm and poetry. Read more…

Tiny Hip Hop Enthusiasts in Cambodian Suburbs

By first glance KK and Shhort seems, with their gang tattoos, mostly like somebody you would prefer not meeting in a dark alley alone. Nevertheless they are two very ambitious guys with a lot of passion for what they do. When I first visited Tiny Toones, I immediately fell in love with the place. Read more…

Rapping the Truth in Vietnam

Hip-hop has historically been known as the voice of the oppressed and as a revolutionary tool. So, how is hip-hop thriving in a country where so much is done to keep the voice of the people oppressed and the chance of a possible revolution down? Read more…